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      KeraVada Natural Hair Blog

      IS HAIR GEL A CANCER RISK IN BLACK WOMEN? (Read Time: 49 sec)

      IS HAIR GEL A CANCER RISK IN BLACK WOMEN? (Read Time: 49 sec)

      What is the price of slayed edges.  I love laying my 4c edges just like the next girl but does the cost have to be getting breast cancer or having a deformed baby???

      I don’t know about you but the labels on most natural hair products are so confusing to me and I have no idea what the stuff listed really is beside the obvious water, alcohol, etc.  But thanks to the naturally curly community online I was able to find out exactly what is in one of our favorite gels.

      According to natural hair beauty blogger, AlopeciaFreeWithJass, Eco Styler Gel does contain an agent that is known to cause cancer.  In a YouTube video she breaks down the ingredients in the popular gel and came across one troubling one, Tetrasodum EDTA.  After reading this I immediately went to my bathroom to see if my jar had Tetrasodum listed.

        

       

       

      KeraVada 24hr Edge Control

       

       According to THE DERM REVIEW

      Products that Contain Tetrasodium EDTA

      Tetrasodium EDTA is formulated into many products, including face creams, shower gels, hair care products, and many other personal care items where the formulas can potentially become degraded through growth of mold. This chemical is even included in food items, though it’s more difficult to identify in such cases.

       

      In some individuals, this chemical has been known to cause skin irritation. Other studies suggest that Tetrasodium EDTA may contribute to the development of cancer. Unfortunately, many companies that claim to make natural skin care products will still use this chemical.

      Eco Styler Olive Oil Gel

      Source: Radio One / Urban One

      Side Effects of Tetrasodium EDTA

      Tetrasodium EDTA side effects include a number of potential problems. In some individuals, this chemical has been known to cause skin irritation. Other studies suggest that Tetrasodium EDTA may contribute to the development of cancer.

      Unfortunately, many companies that claim to make natural skin care products will still use this chemical. This is an interesting development that initially may seem like nonsense. Why would a skin care manufacturer use a synthetic chemical like Tetrasodium EDTA in their formulation, if they believe in using natural cancer?

      The answer may come from the skin care industry simply becoming used to certain ingredients. For example, many brands still formulate their products with excessive amounts of alcohol, fragrance and coloring.

      This may seem counter-intuitive, because alcohol can dry out the skin, and the latter two ingredients are known for causing irritation. However, the industry has simply become accustomed to it, since pretty much everyone seems to do it. Thus, Tetrasodium EDTA seems to be used in much the same way, where most companies simply use it because it’s the norm.

      Tetrasodium EDTA is known for causing allergic reactions and is also linked to causing cancer.  This ingredient is also said to contain chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm.  Additionally, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Cosmetics Ingredient Review (CIR), triethanolamine is best suited for products that should be washed off after application.”

      What Gel do you use and does it contain ingredients that may cause cancer?

       

      Try A Cancer Free Edge Control...

      Bentonite Clay: Natural Hair Secret Weapon, What is it and How to use it? (Read Time: 3 min)

      Bentonite Clay: Natural Hair Secret Weapon, What is it and How to use it? (Read Time: 3 min)

       

      What Is Bentonite Clay?

      Benefits of Using Bentonite Clay on Natural Hair

      When it comes to hair, NCBI states that bentonite clay has been used in Iran and other places around the world as a go-to hair cleanser and softener. The effects of bentonite on human hair haven’t been scientifically assessed, but there are records that show bentonite actually aids growth on sheep wool.

       Despite this, there is evidence that supports bentonite being beneficial to skin⁠—meaning it can positively affect a scalp. Bentonite has been seen to diminish poison ivy and poison oak rashes (as well as other forms of allergy-related contact dermatitis in North America), which is great news for the dry and irritated scalps that can sometimes accompany natural hair types. It can also create a protective barrier or help heal minor wounds, so you can experience a little relief from itchiness.

      How to Use It

      When your mask is ready, apply it to your hair in sections. This can be done to clean, damp, or wet hair, but the most important part is that you evenly saturate all of your hair. Keeping a spray bottle handy will allow you to spritz any section that may dry before you finish working the mask through.

       

      Image result for bentonite clay on natural hair before after

       

      Once your hair is fully coated, you can either leave it as is or cover your head with a plastic cap to trap in the heat for extra penetration. A hooded dryer or steamer can also be used. You should wait about 25 minutes before proceeding to the next step.

      Rinsing the hair and scalp properly is of utmost importance since you’re trying to cleanse the follicle sebum from your scalp to get to the hair follicle.

      Deep Conditioner with Bentonite Clay and Rhassoul Clay

      “Rinsing the hair and scalp properly is of utmost importance since you’re trying to cleanse the follicle sebum from your scalp to get to the follicle,” says certified trichologist Liana Robinson of Y.O.U Hair Wellness & Lifestyle Spa. She also advises using a certified food grade bentonite clay, which helps to improve hair’s absorption of nutrients.  

      How to get "BIG" Volume Twist Outs

      How to get "BIG" Volume Twist Outs

      This is probably the most asked question on this site. "How did you do that look...." - If you want BIG [yet defined hair] listen up: 
      • Make BIG CHUNKY braids or twists: I used about 8 twists on each side. 
      • Smooth the hair out before braiding or twisting: I use a denman brush for this. Make sure your hair is properly detangled prior to smoothing with a brush. 

      • Use a leave-in conditioner: Preferably a stellar one, you want something that is going to leave your hair uber soft. 
      • Leave the braids/twists in until 85-90% DRY. You want it slightly damp, because as it dries, the hair will S W E L L. Trust. So finger style gently, and allow your hair to naturally do it's thing! 

      How To Win Those Thinning Edges Back

      How To Win Those Thinning Edges Back

      How to Win Those Thinning Edges Back: Tips for Braids and Natural Hairstyles

       

      I was recently talking to a woman this week and I have to say she’s my inspiration for this post. The woman had beautiful curls, but I couldn’t help but notice that the edges of her hair, so carefully pinned back by braids, were almost non-existent. I won’t fib and say that I’ve experienced maximum thinning with my edges, but for some reason, I have this spot on my hair line that I swear to this day was caused by a bad accident with Hot 6 Oil.   I’ve also participated in my fair share of natural hairstyles, namely braids, that have tugged on my natural tresses.  Braids and natural hairstyles that slick, tighten, or hurt are one of the leading and controllable reasons for thinning edges and hair loss. However, it’s not impossible to win those tresses back by ditching certain hairstyles.

       

      Quit the Braids, Pony Tails and Harsh Hairstyles in Order to Grow Those Thinning Edges

       

      In my previous post, the natural hairstyles that I’m all about are afros, curls and big hair.  But there have been times when I’ve wanted to use extensions as a great protective natural hairstyle.  I do, however, remember a time when I’ve tried other natural hairstyles in my youth.  My mother-in-law remembers when I wanted to try weave for the first time at 19 (Yes, she was my Mother-in-Law back then!).  We went to a hair salon in Detroit and my mother-in-law, being the weave expert, asked the hairstylist to create a “quick weave”.  I was then asked if I wanted to use “glue” to hold the quick weave.  I politely declined, although at the time I had no idea what hair glue could potentially do to my edges (I was just thinking I was too lazy to try to wash it out).Thinning Edges a Common Problem

       

      I’m not too sure we can call “quick weaves” or wigs, combined with glue, a protective and natural hairstyle, especially if you are trying to keep your edges.  Glues tend to pull and tug at the follicles, and can lead to traction alopecia.

       

      If you just cannot let go of the weave, opt for half wigs or U-part wigs.  These types of wigs give naturalistas free reign when it comes to length retention and saving those edges.  These natural hairstyles often allow for you to leave a little bit of hair out in the front.  This will reduce the stress placed on the hairline.

      How to Wash Natural Hair While Keeping Those Tangles at bay

      How to Wash Natural Hair While Keeping Those Tangles at bay

      “I’ve never had a problem with my hair re-tangling after a detangling session. So, when I initially read about the technique of twisting for washing, conditioning and deep conditioning, I didn’t think it was necessary or relevant for my curl pattern/texture.

      However, several months ago, I started to twist my hair into four sections after applying a Deep Conditioner. Then, when I started pre-pooing and dry finger detangling, I started to twist my hair as I applied my pre-poo of choice.

      Next, I started to twist my hair after I co-washed and detangled each section. Now, I use twists throughout my wash day routines. The reason I’ve done so is that I’ve found that the twists seem to prep my hair to retain TnC and twist out sets. I have about 4 different textures on my head (who doesn’t, right?) and this process of setting the twists seems to create a “memory” for my hair to follow that wave pattern.

      See My Article on How To Deep Conditioner Properly Here:

      However, I believe my TnC and twist-out sets have greatly improved in consistency of pattern, definition and hold from using twists throughout my wash session.”

      What is your wash day routine?  Please share...